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Wohnimmobilien

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Suburban flight has become a big deal in Germany over the last few weeks. A comprehensive new study has just been published, the Postbank Housing Atlas 2016. The study presents a range of findings, including details of the link between city-centre housing prices and the number of workers commuting into and out of a city. Postbank identifies Frankfurt, Düsseldorf and Stuttgart as the German cities with the highest numbers of workers who …

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The Mietpreisbremse is coming under increasingly heavy fire. Originally designed to put a brake on rampant rental increases, restricting rents to a maximum of 10% above local benchmarks, the legislation was introduced last summer and immediately met with a mixture of protest and disbelief (from those within in the residential real estate industry), doubt (from those who predicted that this would be a toothless tiger) and warm acceptance (from those …

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We’re well into February and there has been a recent rush of facts and figures arriving as a flood of studies and reports are released to provide analyses of an almost infinite array of statistics on the German real estate markets in 2015. We’ve covered a number of these developments in this blog before, but thought it would be interesting to highlight some of the key facts and figures relating …

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Housing construction has become such a hot topic in Germany that it has broken out of the dedicated property sections of the country’s major daily newspapers and is now making front-page headlines and being discussed on the comfy sofas of mainstream current affairs programmes. Let’s take a look at some of the facts that everyone seems to agree on, and examine how many of the problems currently putting a brake …

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As far as housing is concerned, and as mentioned in a previous blog post, Germany can be seen pretty much as a nation of tenants rather than owner-occupiers. In major cities such as Berlin and Munich, between 75-85% of the population currently live in rented apartments, which means that only 15-25% are homeowners—extremely low figures when compared to the situation in other European countries. Similar, but different Why do such …

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