Capital Language Solutions | housing
Previous
CLOSE
Next

housing

All the posts.
 

On September 24, 2017: Germany decides   With the last Sunday in September fast approaching and election campaigning reaching fever pitch, Germany’s political parties are busily jockeying for position. It seems highly likely that Angela Merkel will continue as Chancellor, but another coalition government is definitely on the cards. Will the current Grand Coalition of Union (CDU/CSU) and SPD receive a new mandate, or will the FDP win enough votes …

READ MORE →
 

Too much regulation, too much red tape, too few incentives for developers and investors – Germany’s real estate industry seems to be up in arms on an almost weekly basis. Milieuschutz, Mietpreisbremse, Zweckentfremdungsverbot, European real estate credit agreement directives, Bestellerprinzip…the list goes on and on. Given the uproar with every market intervention proposed by attention-seeking (and vote-seeking) politicians across the political spectrum, we thought it might be interesting to discover whether …

READ MORE →
 

Suburban flight has become a big deal in Germany over the last few weeks. A comprehensive new study has just been published, the Postbank Housing Atlas 2016. The study presents a range of findings, including details of the link between city-centre housing prices and the number of workers commuting into and out of a city. Postbank identifies Frankfurt, Düsseldorf and Stuttgart as the German cities with the highest numbers of workers who …

READ MORE →
 

Project development – tax breaks planned Project development is crucial if Germany is to get to grips with its housing crisis. There  was a very interesting article in Spiegel Online on 26.11.2015 outlining plans being floated by Germany’s coalition government, namely via the CDU’s “iron-fisted” finance minister Wolfgang Schäuble, to help relieve the pressures on housing in many of the country’s major cities. Read on to find out what the coalition …

READ MORE →
 

Observing the impact of the refugee crisis on Germany’s housing market over the last few days has certainly been interesting. Alongside the usual studies, reports and comment pieces on the continual onward march of rents and property prices (both still rising, although not to the same extent as recent months/years), the shortage of affordable housing, increases in the number of pipeline projects and building permits issued, etc., there have been …

READ MORE →
 

As far as housing is concerned, and as mentioned in a previous blog post, Germany can be seen pretty much as a nation of tenants rather than owner-occupiers. In major cities such as Berlin and Munich, between 75-85% of the population currently live in rented apartments, which means that only 15-25% are homeowners—extremely low figures when compared to the situation in other European countries. Similar, but different Why do such …

READ MORE →
 

Milieuschutz—necessary intervention or a step too far? In this third article on the German housing market, we’re moving on to the third currently hot “M” in the German residential real estate industry – Milieuschutz. Unlike the Mietpreisbremse (a product of Germany’s current coalition government), protecting the character, identity and social mix of a neighbourhood via Milieuschutz goes back more than 40 years to the early 1970s.   Restricting the market …

READ MORE →
 

The Mietspiegel—A funhouse mirror? There is a great deal of interest in Germany’s housing markets from overseas’ investors and there are a large number of non-German speakers living in the country, particularly in major cities such as Berlin, Munich, Frankfurt and Hamburg. Germans have a long-standing preference for living in rented apartments rather than buying property—although this might change slightly thanks to low interest rates and steadily increasing rents. In …

READ MORE →