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Style is always important to our clients, who operate in a range of different business fields – e.g. real estate, energy, public relations and science and technology – and regularly produce texts, whether business-to-business or business-to-consumer brochures, press releases, blog articles or newsletters, that include frequent references to business developments, economic trends, studies and market research. These texts all have at least one thing in common – they are full of numbers, percentages, …

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Continuing our series of language-related blog posts, we have decided to focus on one of our favourite German verbs – vermitteln. Read on to find out why we love this verb and to see why it enriches the life of a German to English translator so much.   vermitteln – Origins This verb may have evolved over time to signify a fairly wide range of meanings, and have amassed a …

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It’s not actually that easy to select our favourite translation projects 2015. One of the best things about life as translators is that, alongside our specialisation in texts on financial, real estate and general business topics, we also have the pleasure of working on texts from a range of genres and with a varied range of subject matter. At this time of year, as 2015 draws to an end, we thought …

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 Corporate brochures are a major element of any company’s branding and communications. A great deal of effort goes into getting them just right. Ideally, a brochure’s language will be simple, accessible, clear and powerful – not a long list, admittedly, but one that it is deceptively difficult to deliver on. A company’s brochure is as much a key marketing platform as the company’s website or advertising. It’s a real waste …

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 What is a Prokurist and what are their chief duties and responsibilities? A large majority of the population spend their lives working in a single country, even if they do switch careers or employers from time to time. They could be forgiven for thinking that businesses are organised according to similar principles from one country to the next and that the positions and roles within businesses are pretty much equivalent. …

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I will never understand how often the most basic translation mistakes make it through the review process and end up being published. How do we feel when we read something peppered with the most basic errors? What kind of impression does this create for a company’s prospective clients, partners or employees? Why do some companies not seem to take anywhere near the same level of care in sourcing translated texts as they do with crafting …

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Frustratingly, the English versions of many German websites still insist upon using imprint or impress as translations of “Impressum.” I know that I am not the first translator to take up this baton, but it seems that, despite the best efforts of a number of very experienced and committed translators, little has changed. In this blog post, we’ll take a look at why this far from an ideal translation and present …

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Bestellerprinzip and Mietpreisbremse: Germany’s tenancy law reforms, the Grand Coalition’s Mietrechtsnovellierungsgesetz (MietNovG), came into force on 01.06.2015 and brought a number of major changes, and a major dose of uncertainty, with them. We’ve already looked at one of the biggest reforms, the Mietpreisbremse, which has given local authorities the power to impose rental controls in neighbourhoods with “overheated” housing markets. The second major reform, and one that is starting to …

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How to get the perfect translation results   Translation, like any other form of creative writing, depends on a number of factors. Understandably, having a native-speaker translator who is familiar with your subject area helps a great deal. Direct communication with your translator or translation project manager will also make it easier to coordinate the entire process and enable you to pass on your individual specifications and preferences. Using a translator …

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Mitch Fuqua [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons How do you deal with “betreuen”? There are some German words that just don’t have a single, direct equivalent in English. A few weeks back, we looked at the verb “realisieren” and today the lucky word is “betreuen”. If you want to know more about this verb and its related noun “Betreuung”, all you have to do is read on!   “Betreuen” in context …

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English—soon Germany’s second official language?   If you follow us on Facebook and twitter (and you really should!), you’ll have seen that we recently linked to an article by Chris Pyak, CEO of Immigrant Spirit GmbH in the Huffington Post, itself an updated and extended version of an article that appeared in The European in November 2014. Chris Pyak calls for English to become Germany’s second official language and bases …

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It’s common knowledge that when someone from the UK talks about football, they mean the game with a spherical ball that is played over 90 minutes, and not the gridiron game involving touchdowns, extensive padding and oval balls (or, for the mathematically inclined, prolate spheroids). When it comes to language, in particular the sporting idioms that have become common in both forms of English, it is clear that there …

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Two nations separated by a common language Although no one is 100% sure who first described the relationship between British and American English in this way (Wilde? Winston Churchill? George Bernard Shaw? None of the aforementioned?), but what everyone can agree on is the fact there are many minor and a number of fairly major differences between BrE and AmE. Considering the different forms of English used within a 50-mile …

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Blessed press release Most translators work regularly across a variety of text types and genres, from press articles and releases and chatty blog posts to more formal corporate communications, from speeches and presentations to market reports. In regular blog posts we’ll be taking a look at some of the key features of the different genres and exploring what a translator needs to bear in mind as they switch from …

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I promised that this blog would look at words and expressions that appear frequently in German source texts and need to be approached by translators with a degree of flexibility and understanding. For this post, we’re going to take a look at the German verb realisieren—temptingly similar to the English verb “to realise/realize”—a verb with a wide range of meanings depending, obviously, on the context. Thinking like a translator Whether …

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Quality assurance is not just important in the translation process, but where a company’s image and future business prospects depend on the best translation possible, quality assurance should not be overlooked. Corporate communication, magazine articles and mass media publications only see the light of day after a process that normally involves brainstorming meetings (to set the overall agenda, generate topics and assign tasks), individual creativity (to research and write the …

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Although we translate texts for companies across a wide variety of sectors, including fashion, tourism, law and marketing, you’ll probably have seen from our website that we specialise in the real estate industry. This blog post will examine three parallels between the translation business and the businesses of our major, long-term clients (e.g. investment companies, asset and portfolio managers, project developers, commercial real estate companies and rating agencies). The first parallel …

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Welcome to the Capital Language Solutions blog! As translators, teachers and social media specialists, our lives are all about communicating successfully, conveying information effectively and engaging in intercultural dialogues. That’s why my partner, Richard Mayda (Los Angeles, US) and I, Sebastian Taylor (Birmingham, UK) set up Capital Language Solutions. As the world gets more connected, people are communicating across borders as never before. We are here to help you make …

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