Capital Language Solutions | 2015 Juni
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Juni, 2015

All the posts.
 

English—soon Germany’s second official language?   If you follow us on Facebook and twitter (and you really should!), you’ll have seen that we recently linked to an article by Chris Pyak, CEO of Immigrant Spirit GmbH in the Huffington Post, itself an updated and extended version of an article that appeared in The European in November 2014. Chris Pyak calls for English to become Germany’s second official language and bases …

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Everyone knows it: Berlin is “in”, tolerant, affordable—and growing. Monocle magazine just ranked the city as the third most “liveable” city in the world, citing the openness of the German capital’s population, the interesting mix of independent and high-street shops, lively and varied nightlife, low crime rate, expansive green spaces, conducive business environment and (relatively) affordable housing.   Where to look Finding an apartment to rent or buy in …

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Milieuschutz – necessary intervention or a step too far? In this third article on the German housing market, we’re moving on to the third currently hot “M” in the German residential real estate industry – Milieuschutz. Unlike the Mietpreisbremse (a product of Germany’s current coalition government), protecting the character, identity and social mix of a neighbourhood via Milieuschutz goes back more than 40 years to the early 1970s.   Restricting …

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Mietpreisbremse – putting the brakes on In this second article on the German housing market, we’re going to examine the recent Mietpreisbremse (rental control/cap, literally “rental brake”) legislation and see how it ties in with the Mietspiegel from part one. If you are an investor, landlord or tenant in one of Germany’s major cities, you are probably going to feel the impact of the Mietpreisbremse sooner, rather than later. As mentioned …

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The Mietspiegel—A funhouse mirror There is a great deal of interest in Germany’s housing markets from overseas‘ investors and there are a large number of non-German speakers living in the country, particularly in major cities such as Berlin, Munich, Frankfurt and Hamburg. Germans have a long-standing preference for living in rented apartments rather than buying property—although this might change slightly thanks to low interest rates and steadily increasing rents. In …

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It’s common knowledge that when someone from the UK talks about football, they mean the game with a spherical ball that is played over 90 minutes, and not the gridiron game involving touchdowns, extensive padding and oval balls (or, for the mathematically inclined, prolate spheroids). When it comes to language, in particular the sporting idioms that have become common in both forms of English, it is clear that there …

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Two nations separated by a common language Although no one is 100% sure who first described the relationship between British and American English in this way (Wilde? Winston Churchill? George Bernard Shaw? None of the aforementioned?), but what everyone can agree on is the fact there are many minor and a number of fairly major differences between BrE and AmE. Considering the different forms of English used within a 50-mile …

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Blessed press release Most translators work regularly across a variety of text types and genres, from press articles and releases and chatty blog posts to more formal corporate communications, from speeches and presentations to market reports. In regular blog posts we’ll be taking a look at some of the key features of the different genres and exploring what a translator needs to bear in mind as they switch from …

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I promised that this blog would look at words and expressions that appear frequently in German source texts and need to be approached by translators with a degree of flexibility and understanding. For this post, we’re going to take a look at the German verb realisieren—temptingly similar to the English verb “to realise/realize”—a verb with a wide range of meanings depending, obviously, on the context. Thinking like a translator Whether …

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Quality assurance is not just important in the translation process, but where a company’s image and future business prospects depend on the best translation possible, quality assurance should not be overlooked. Corporate communication, magazine articles and mass media publications only see the light of day after a process that normally involves brainstorming meetings (to set the overall agenda, generate topics and assign tasks), individual creativity (to research and write the …

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Although we translate texts for companies across a wide variety of sectors, including fashion, tourism, law and marketing, you’ll probably have seen from our website that we specialise in the real estate industry. This blog post will examine three parallels between the translation business and the businesses of our major, long-term clients (e.g. investment companies, asset and portfolio managers, project developers, commercial real estate companies and rating agencies). The first parallel …

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Welcome to the Capital Language Solutions blog! As translators, teachers and social media specialists, our lives are all about communicating successfully, conveying information effectively and engaging in intercultural dialogues. That’s why my partner, Richard Mayda (Los Angeles, US) and I, Sebastian Taylor (Birmingham, UK) set up Capital Language Solutions. As the world gets more connected, people are communicating across borders as never before. We are here to help you make …

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